Faith No More

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2903, 2017

INTERVIEW: Bill Gould speaks to Balkan Rock

March 29th, 2017|Faith No More, Interviews, News|12 Comments

Faith No More’s Bill Gould has spoken to Serbian music website Balkan Rock, with a lengthy interview published yesterday.

Here are some choice cuts:

On Sol Invictus:

“[Sol Invictus] was definitely a lot of work, like all our albums usually are, but I could say that this album was certainly the biggest challenge in the sense that we were all by ourselves, almost as in a vacuum…I always thought that the band had much more to say, so I’m very happy that it came to this.

On the band:

I also realized that as long as the band exists, I will have to accept that some things will never change.

The positive side is that everyone has the opportunity to contribute, so that the result is usually better than would have been the case that it comes from one individual or doubles. In addition, I think it creates an atmosphere of teamwork that is transferred to our performances. On the other hand, things become very inefficient when decisions are made.

Oh, and Billy also mentioned some of the bands he likes listening to: Usssy, Burial, BadBadNotGood, Getatchew Mekurya, Bucolica, Protomartyr.

 

 

703, 2017

Roddy Bottum to star alongside Michael Cera in new Sebastian Silva film

March 7th, 2017|Faith No More, News|12 Comments

Faith No More founder member and keyboard player Roddy Bottum will step in front of the camera in the new movie from star Chilean director Sebastian Silva.

Roddy shared some on-location photos from filming in the Catskills on Instagram last week, and he has revealed more details on the project to us at Faith No More 2.0.

Roddy said: “I just finished two weeks shooting a film called Tyrel by director Sebastian Silva. He’s a good friend of mine and asked me to be in his new movie. It is sort of an ensemble piece about a group of guys that go on a birthday weekend trip up to the Catskills in a cabin. Michael Cera, Caleb Landry Jones [Get Out], Jason Mitchell [Straight Outta Compton] and Chris Abbott also star.”

Silva is the rising star of South American cinema with a trio of breakout highly-lauded English-language movies in Crystal Fairy (the 2013 film that inspired the band name of the latest Ipecac super group), Magic Magic (both also staring Cera) and Nasty Baby.

Roddy is no stranger to the world of film either. An avid filmmaker in his teens, Roddy initially moved to San Francisco in 1981 to study film at San Francisco State University. Roddy has scored Adam & Steve (2005), What Goes Up (2009), Kabluey (2007), scored Gigantic [2008], Fred the Movie (2010) and the documentary Hit So Hard [2010].

Roddy added: “I think it’s gonna be a really special movie. He’s kind of my favorite filmmaker.”

Nico’s porch swing

A post shared by Roddy Bottum (@roddybottum) on

it’s so cold with Caleb

A post shared by Roddy Bottum (@roddybottum) on

guys. the director is so mean.

A post shared by Roddy Bottum (@roddybottum) on

1402, 2017

TOP 10: Faith No More’s most romantic songs

February 14th, 2017|Faith No More, News|2 Comments

Faith No More don’t do romance. They don’t do love songs. They don’t do personal.

Certainly in the Mike Patton era, the lyrics to Faith No More songs have largely eschewed the personal – and indeed the biographical. Both the music and the lyrics are instead created as scenes rather than personal sketches or deep revelations into the soul. Mike Patton told Rock Hard in 2015:

“I like creating fictional characters and trying to appropriate their psychology…They are little films. To be totally frank, I do not know exactly myself what some of my lyrics say because I try before anything else to follow the music. When I discover a new song, I imagine the sounds and the notes on top. Only then do I try to find the words which come the closest as possible to what I have heard in my head.”

So finding traditional love songs in the Faith No More oeuvre is not a straightforward task. Nonetheless, with the help of some covers, here’s a top 10 for Valentine’s Day.

10 Spanish Eyes

A cover provoked by Bill Gould’s spell of listening to San Francisco oldie easy-listening station Magic 61, Spanish Eyes was originally recorded by Al Martino in 1965 and is a reworking of a song called Moon Over Naples released the same year. The FNM version was released as the B-side of Ricochet on most UK and European releases in May 1995. The song was recorded, like all King for a Day B-sides at Bill Gould’s studio – and is one of the only Faith No More recordings to feature Dean Menta on guitar. It has never been played live.
(More here from FNM Followers / photo by Patton Mad)

 

9 This Guy’s in Love with You

“Who doesn’t love some Burt Bacharach?” asked Mike Patton as he introduced this cover on the band’s 2015 BBC Radio 1 session. Patton adores the classic composer – “If you don’t like his stuff, you don’t know shit” he told Kerrang in 1997 – while Roddy Bottum added at the same BBC session: “Its a song with a real twist. He’s such a crafty songwriter. We’ve always loved this song and this is the first time we’ve ever recorded the song.”

For a song which became such a staple of their live show, Faith No More did not play This Guy until right near the end of the 1.0 era – on 16 September 1997 at the 9:30 Club in Washington, DC.

 

8 The Crab Song

Chuck Mosley‘s lyrics tended to the autobiographical much more than Mike Patton’s. Certainly, Faith No More, while often hitting the depths of misanthropy, have rarely sounded so out and out melancholic as on this track. Written by Chuck (lyrics) and Bill and Mike Bordin (music), the track was released on Introduce Yourself in 1987 and has remained a live favourite ever since. It is emblematic of IY era Faith No More: Chuck ad-libs, moody synth wash, plangent bass, dramatic segue into all-out thrash. And the perfect Valentine’s Day lyrics:

“Hurts, hurts, hurts like a like a motherfucker
Love, it hurts, it kills, like a sonofabitch”

Here’s a very early live version  – from 1985

7 Glory Box

Our final cover. Faith No More, like the rest of the world, couldn’t resist trip-hop in the mid-1990s and offered up this perfect cover of the sublime Glory Box from Portishead’s Dummy. FNM even went full-on Bristol on their 1997 release Album of the Year with Stripsearch the perfect trip-rock song (Bill Gould Keybord magazine 1997: “The loop in the beginning made such a difference. Before we put it in, the song sounded more like Queensryche. But after the loop, it sounded more like Portishead or something. It gave it a darker, different slant. It didn’t sound like a rock band anymore.”). Anyway, here’s the iconic version of Glory Box with Patton bathing in all of Santiago’s spittle at the Monsters of Rock Chile in 1995, the last of the 13 times they would play the song live.

6 Pristina

Seemingly a reference to the Kosovan capital, the final song on Faith No More final pre-split album was a fitting farewell and another stunning evocation of mood. That came mostly in the music but the lyrics also suggest a parting of lovers:

In every flower bed
In every marriage bed

I’ll be with you
I’m watching you

5 Be Aggressive

Probably more of a sex song than a love song per se, the lyrics for this famously homoerotic Angel Dust track were penned by Roddy Bottum before he came out as gay in 1993. I’ll include it as a love song purely for this line which at least suggests temporary infatuation:
“You’re my flavor of the week”

4 Underwater Love

A metal-based Onion-style satire site once claimed that a woman in Wisconsin had tried to get this song banned due to it apparently encouraging children to become mermaids. The song, of course, makes no such allusions but does contain just enough darkness beneath its oh so shiny surface to make such stories credible. In a rare early explanation of his lyrics or perhaps a bluff, Patton told Kerrang! in 1990: “Underwater Love was basically about murdering someone you love.”
But in the spirit of the day that’s in it, we’ll imagine that these lyrics have a more romantic meaning:

It’s wonderful how the surface ripples
But you’re perfect and I cannot breathe

Forever longing to make you mine
But I can’t escape your stare

Hold me closer, keep me near
My underwater love

Hold me closer, keep me near
I’ll never get enough

Here’s a a 1988 demo version – with significantly different lyrics

The band have not played the song live since November 1992.

3 I Won’t Forget You

The lyrics initially read like the sweet and sentimental ballad of a loser in love. Mike Patton’s brutal and pained delivery suggest something more menacing, with the metaphorical hell of abandonment the most innocent explanation.

You never love someone
Only what they leave behind
And I won’t forget you

I Won’t Forget You is a Patton/Gould composition recorded during the King For A Day… Fool For A Lifetime sessions. It appeared on Who Cares a Lot, the awfully titled compilation from 1998, and it has never been played live.

2 From Out of Nowhere

Probably Faith No More’s finest pop moment. Track one from The Real Thing is a song that could and should have propelled them to mainstream success months before Epic finally did. Keyboard-led, hooky, catchy, those Patton vocals and eventually some Jim Martin crunching adornment, it is The Real Thing in three minutes, 21 seconds.

Obsession rules me
I’m yours from the start
I know you see me
Our eyes interlock

Jim and Faith No More Followers have everything you ever need to know about the song here so I’ll not add much more , only to extract these quotes from Roddy Bottum and Mike Patton on the song’s meaning.

Roddy: “It seems to be about a chance meeting, and how chance plays a role in interaction”,

Patton: “Jello shots, hermetic philosophy, Ptolemaic cosmology… you know, your average commie/junkie jibber-jabber.”

Here’s the band “performing” the song on UK TV institution Top of the Pops in 1990.

1 She Loves Me Not

Regarded by reviewers as either cheesy or soulful when it came out in 1997 on Album of the Year, the straightforward romantic soul of She Loves Me Not was initially met with ambivalence by the band themselves.
The track was written by Bill Gould, Mike Patton and Mike Bordin, and Bill gave their take on the song to Keyboard magazine in 1997:

“This song almost didn’t make it on the record. We almost didn’t even record vocals for it because it’s so different from all of the other songs. I wrote this song, and I was almost embarrassed to play it for anybody in the band because it’s so soft – but at the same time it’s a good song. It’s like a Boyz II Men song of something. I didn’t play it for anybody for, like, a half a year, and then finally I played it for Puffy. He thought we should give it a try, so I gave it to Patton, and he said, ‘I wrote words, but they’re pretty over-the-top.’ But we went forward with it, and he really sang his ass off.”

Some of those over-the-top words:

I’m here, alone
On the the telephone line

I’m right where you want me to be
And I’ll wait alone and never ask why
Ill be where you want me to be

1002, 2017

LONG READ: The story of Faith No More’s first number one

February 10th, 2017|Faith No More, News|5 Comments

“We’ve got to crack that radio attitude. Too many bands that were great bands have withered up and died because they didn’t pursue it and most of the world never got to hear about them.”

Faith No More bassist and talisman Bill Gould was speaking to The Sydney Morning Herald in June 1990, making no excuses for a band seeking chart and commercial success. It was fitting then that Australia proved the locus for their breakthrough chart success. on 26 August, 1990, the band’s Epic single reached the top of Australia’s official ARIA singles charts.

It was Faith No More’s first number one anywhere – and the first of two in Australia. Remarkably, the band had not even set foot in Oz until one month before topping the chart. Their first show was in Transformers in Brisbane on 29 July. They also played a live session for leading Australian radio station Triple J around this time. Officially dated as 30 July and broadcast on that date, the session may actually have been recorded on the 28 or 29 July. The redoubtable FNM Live site reports: “Puffy walks out during “War Pigs” due to taunts from the band about his playing. He had hurt his ribs during bungee jumping in New Zealand. Patton takes over drums on the song.” That bungee jump was widely reported with the San Francisco Chronicle capturing some band comments:

“It was sheer terror, I would never have done it except for the peer group pressure from the other guys in the band,” said bassist Bill Gould, who arrived Monday in Sydney with the group’s entourage for six performances. “It was so bloody high, I’ve never been so horrified in my entire life,” Gould said. “But it turned out to be the best thing I’ve ever done.” Vocalist Mike Patton added to the adventure by dangling from the elastic cable clad in only his undershorts and a sweatshirt.

Check out some discussion of and footage from that jump here on New Zealand TV (via Faith No More Followers)

And here is the actual session

The band played an impressive 13 shows in Australia in late July and August – and this and a promo roller-coaster propelled them to the top spot. Not that the critics were completely overwhelmed by their live shows, with the Sydney Morning Herald reviewing one of their two Marquee Sydney shows under the headline: “THE CROWD CAME FOR THE NOISE, AND NOISE IS WHAT THEY GOT”. The article also stated:

“While their name suggests a kind of disaffected nihilism, perfectly suited to the times, they are, in reality, strikingly loyal to their antecedents; their present is very much the literal transfiguration of their past, the sum of their influences.

They come on stage to a tape that sounds like Shostakovich meeting Metallica, or the brooding soundtrack to some big-budget Hollywood feature, and attempt – not always successfully – to maintain that sense of the epic, the cinematic, throughout the course of their performance.

There’s no reason why it shouldn’t work: on record, their music is a seamless fusion of abrasive power chords and symphonic keyboard washes – the effect veering oddly between some of the more pompous excesses of the ’70s(Rush, Emerson Lake&Palmer, et al), and contemporary hardcore speed metal.

Witnessed live, however, volume and distortion conspire to deny that all important balance, with the effect that guitar swamps the proceedings, and much of the subtlety is lost.”

The review concludes:

“This is not to say it wasn’t good – for a metal concert (which was, after all, what most of the audience expected and desired), it was fine. As an event, though, it lacked only that ineffable something that would have taken it from being merely good, into the realm of the truly extraordinary.

I’ts a pity, because that other, higher goal was always within sight, but proved just out of reach.”

The rest of Australia was hooked, however. The re-released single of Epic, with a B-side of The Morning After (and including a yellow cassette single version) was released in late July. Here’s what it looked like, courtesy of Patton Mad.

Epic entered the chart on 22 July 1990 at a creditable 31, the highest new entry of the week. By the following week, it had risen to number 17, nestled between Madonna’s Hanky Panky and Snap’s The Power.

(All chart images and info courtesy of the incredible Chart Beats website)

The following week (5 August) it hit the top 10, reaching number 2 the week after. But Epic was held at bay for two weeks by the continued dominance of none other than…MC Hammer. With U Can’t Touch This.

Hammer was wrong. One week later, Faith No More touched number one – and they would stay there for three weeks in total. (Holding off firstly the challenge of Concrete Blonde’s Joey and then Jon Bon Jovi’s Blaze of Glory). It was finally knocked off the top spot on 16 September by the hirsute New Jerseyian’s cowboy anthem.

Well-timed touring, Australia’s openness to rock music, a killer song and targeted promotion all combined to earn Faith No More’s first number one. Local record store Utopia also claimed some of the glory. In September, the Morning Herald featured an interview with Dave Defig from the Sydney store. He said: “We basically discovered Faith No More here years ago; somebody woke up to them finally and they’ve now had a number one.”

The band would score two further notable triumphs in Australia in 1990. Epic ranked at 22 in the chart of the year’s best-selling singles. Then on 23 December Faith No More won the Gisborne Handicap (1,000m) at Moonee Valley. A horse named in their honour, of course.

I’m Easy

Faith No More would go on to have a second Australian number one in 1993. I’m Easy, as Easy was entitled on this release, reached the top spot on the singles chart on 16 May – after nine weeks on the chart. It stayed there for two weeks – dropping Lenny Kravitz’s Are You Gonna Go My Way to 2 – before being usurped by Janet Jackson’s That’s The Way Love Goes.

Just like in 1990. Faith No More’s chart-topping came just after a the band had played a series of shows in Australia. In fact, the band played 11 shows in little over two weeks and were in New Zealand playing in Christchurch they day they hit number one in Australia again. And this time the reviews were more positive:

What makes Faith No More more than just another bunch of hairies who know how to crank it up is the perverse, self-parodying streak that runs through their work. You get the feeling, as each song begins, that it might end up somewhere completely different, maybe even visiting a few interesting places along the way.

The addition of keyboard player Rodney Bottum to the standard guitar-based lineup gives them room for contrast and, recalling the Mothers of Invention, he spends a lot of his time inserting atmospherics that run against the grain of the work, odd juxtapositions that convert what might otherwise be too linear into a tangle of ideas.

In one song, they sample the Happy Mondays’ Hallelujah, and in another, begin with a funkier version of the theme from Twin Peaks. Any band that can include fragments of the Bay City Rollers and the Birthday Party in one of their own tracks, Be Aggressive, has to be applauded.

It is this sense of playfulness, this undercurrent of mischief that makes Faith No More so appealing and made the Hordern crowds stand on the seats to catch a glimpse.
(Sydney Morning Herald)

And the band performed the show live on Nine Network’s evening show Hey Hey It’s Saturday in late April.

In an interview with – you guessed it – the Sydney Morning Herald on 6 May, Mike Patton explained some of the logic behind I’m Easy:

“I remember we were talking to a guy from this death metal band called Morbid Angel. They’re this amazing band who are really powerful – but hilarious at the same time.” He frowns: “Though I’m not sure if they’re aware of that or not …

“Anyway, this guy said how much he loved our version of Easy, and I said, ‘Well, why don’t you guys do something like that? You’re the guys who should be trying that. I mean, you’d just take people’s heads off if you were to do something like an easy-listening album.’

“And he just looked at me and said, ‘You don’t understand. We can’t do that. We physically can’t do it.’ Which to me, just goes to show how people in the entertainment industry build their own prisons. This band will never do that.”

Faith No More’s two number ones means they have as many chart-toppers in Australia as David Bowie and Prince. Even more incredibly, they have twice as many Aussie number ones as Australian icons AC/DC, INXS, Nick Cave and Nathalie Imbruglia combined.

 

 

 

802, 2017

Faith No More LINKS FOR A DAY. Vol 203: New MTV video, Roddy Das Model, True-Fi delay, Gotham likes FNM

February 8th, 2017|Faith No More, Links for a day|0 Comments

MTV videos

Jim from Faith No More Followers has compiled a video of behind-the-scenes MTV footage from Faith No More’s infamous North American tour with Guns N’ Roses and Metallica in 1992.

I stumbled across the behind-the-scenes MTV footage of the Another Body Murdered video shoot this week too – as uploaded by ingnseps in 2009

Roddy Das Model

Roddy Bottum will feature in the forthcoming issue of Out magazine in their spread on ageing gay icons.
Here’s a taster from Roddy’s Instagram

thanks @jackpierson9 thanks @outmagazine #malemodel #nevertoolate #talktomyagent

A photo posted by Roddy Bottum (@roddybottum) on

 

True-Fi delay

As we reported last night on our brand spanking new Facebook page, the Sonarworks True-Fi release of Cone of Shame will now come later today.

Patton animation update

Friend of the site Ben Mitchell (and what a radio voice Ben possesses!) has an interview with Norwegian animator and director Rune Spaans on his Skwigly Animation Podcast in which he speaks about The Absence of Eddy Table which of course features the voice of Mike Patton.

Gotham loves Faith No More

We covered this on Facebook over the weekend. If anyone can track down a screengrab from season 2 episode 14 “This Ball of Mud and Meanness” which features a Sol Invictus poster that would be great to have.

202, 2017

Faith No More Sonar Works new interviews

February 2nd, 2017|Faith No More, News|1 Comment

The intriguing Faith No More tie-up with audio fidelity experts Sonar Works will not be revealed until 7 February, when an enhanced version of Cone of Shame will be released for all who sign up. In the meantime, the collaboration continues to produce some fascinating video content.

SIGN UP HERE

In the latest clip, Bill Gould speaks about sound – and we also here from long-time producer Matt Wallace and band manager Tim Moss.

And here is Sonar Works’ first video in which Matt Wallace makes the not-all-that-surprising revelation that Bill had amassed 50-60 “Faith No More” songs during the band’s hiatus.

102, 2017

Faith No More biography

February 1st, 2017|Faith No More, News|4 Comments

As you may have seen the interview in Punk Globe with the legendary Ginger Coyote, I am working on a biography of Faith No More.

But…it is very early in the whole process. The book is barely started and I haven’t got a publisher.

Having said that, I am aiming to produce the definitive Faith No More biography, one that combines a fan’s passion with a reporter’s expertise. The book will – if it sees the light of day –  chronicle how such a heterogeneous group formed, flourished and fractured, and how Faith No More helped redefine rock, metal and alternative music.

Thanks to everyone who has helped so far, and I will keep you posted on future developments.

And if you have any information, tales, insights, old clippings, band photos, concert posters etc please email me at newfaithnomore@gmail.com

1412, 2016

Links for a Day vol 201: Billy interview, Patton joins Dead Cross, Chuck interview

December 14th, 2016|Faith No More, Links for a day, News|5 Comments

A belated round-up

Bill Gould’s Team Rock interview

Bill Gould’s latest interview as part of the We Care a Lot re-issue promotion was a Q and A in Team Rock/Classic Rock largely focusing on the band’s early days and motivations:

Choice cuts:

With FNM, how much of what you do is art provocation and how much instinctive miscreancy?

It’s a bit of everything. People get hung up on how we fit into their box. We don’t think about it too hard. We just do what feels good.

You never seemed like one of those Last Gang In Town type of bands – more a confederacy of opposites. Fair?

Completely. We were a bunch of people with different abilities and quirks; a dysfunctional family. Jim came from the metal world, which was very different for us. [Chuck Mosley, first frontman] was the wild card; that was part of his charm. We were just playing loops and he would scream over the top. It was hard when we started getting into patterns and structure and touring – it became more like regular work. That’s when the tension started.

And

You must be proud of the band’s achievements: you defined a style of music, defied it, then defiled it.

All of that. It’s cool. You respect what you do, but at the same time you’re a bit of an iconoclast.

Every band has a voice. FNM’s is snarky, sarcastic, even satirical. Are you the hard-rock Steely Dan?

Ha ha! It’s funny, it’s almost like forensics: you have to take the dead body apart to see what the fuck it’s made of.

What a strange band.

Yeah. But at least we’re not boring.

Full interview here – offered as part of fremium service so maybe paywalled

Here are some scans – courtesy of Faith No More French Community

Mike Patton joins Dead Cross

As predicted by Patton Fanatic several months ago, Mike Patton will be the new singer in Dave Lombardo’s new project Dead Cross. Jim from FNM Followers has interviewed Justin Pearson, bassist in the supergroup:

How did this collaboration come about? Was it simply a matter of a phone call to Patton?

Well, yes. Lombardo, Crain, and myself had thought of a few people to sing, Patton being one. Fortunately for us, the universe had its shit together… and here we are.

You had written material with Gabe Serbian prior to parting ways. Did you start afresh when Patton was enlisted?

We had the songs written and recorded prior to Patton’s involvement. When we started working with Patton, he jumped in and started working on lyrics and recording vocals.

So how has Patton’s influence changed the sound?

It’s hard to explain. The band is still finding it’s own skin to fit into. No matter whom you bring into a band, the sound becomes who all are part of it. Let’s revisit this question after the album comes out, after we play shows with the new line up, and after we can reflect on things.

The album will come out in early 2017 through Patton’s Ipecac label.

Brilliant Chuck Mosley interview

One of the few pleasures of 2016 has been the rehabilitation of the reputation of Chuck Mosley during the promotion of We Care a Lot. And Chuck, who has been in the studio working on the second Primitive Race album, has given a very revealing interview with Fear and Loathing in which he expounds at length on the early days of Faith No More.

Some choice cuts:

You first met Billy Gould when you were both going to punk gigs in Hollywood ?

‘Yeah, I met him when I was about 17 or 18, I think. He was the first one of those guys I met, because I didn’t even meet Roddy until Billy had moved up to Berkeley. We both had this friend, Mark Stewart, who I had known since Elementary school. He started to play guitar around the same time that I started playing piano, but I didn’t really see him play until we were in the 12th grade or something. Then one day we were hanging out and he started playing something and I discovered that he had got really good, so I said we should start a band. He asked Billy and two other friends, Paul and Kevin, and that was what became The Animated. As soon as me and Billy met, we pretty-much clicked. He was into all the same bands that I was into, so we started going to shows together. I think he liked going out to shows with me because I didn’t have any limits, so it was like going along to see how drunk I would get or if I was going to get in a fight or what was I going to knock over or what I was going to fuck-up… It was like that most nights, I was pretty-much out of control for various personal reasons. I always went out just to see the bands, that was all I intended to do, but it would often end up in those kind of situations.’

You’d already sung with them on a couple of occasions, just as a temporary thing, hadn’t you ?

‘Yeah, because they were going through different singers and guitar players every other week. So they’d call me if they had a show in LA, and say, we haven’t got a singer, can you do it ? I’d get up and sing with them when they came down to LA without a singer. Billy always loved irony and I wasn’t a singer back then, so it made sense to him that they should ask me to sing!’

Patton Fanatic discography timeline

Patton Fanatic continue to deliver killer content and they have put together a very nifty Mike Patton discography interactive timeline on their site.

Check it out.

1412, 2016

Roddy Bottum set to debut new opera Ride

December 14th, 2016|Faith No More, News|3 Comments

2016 may have been a relatively fallow year for Faith No More (We Care a Lot re-issue aside) but as usual the individual band members are keeping as busy as the Trump Tower lifts. Roddy has returned to opera and his latest opus – The Ride – will be performed at the Merkin Music Center in New York tomorrow night (15 December).

The opera chronicles two gay men from different generations who take part in an AIDS charity bike ride from San Francisco, CA to Los Angeles, CA. Roddy of course has taken part in the bike ride himself and raised quite a considerable sum of money for the cause.

“The older generation of gay men who dealt with AIDS as a life threatening disease and were in the trenches for the first generation of the disease helped their friends get through life or death situations,” Roddy told Experiements in Opera, who are present the piece as part of Story Binge II. “The generation of gay men today who are on PrEP drugs and TRUVADA don’t really view the disease as life threatening. It’s just a different relationship. And that, to me, is interesting.”

Story Binge II is a single evening event featuring semi-staged and concert versions of five works in progress. Throughout this 15-minute opera, the characters sing and talk from stationary bikes about how their participation in The Ride is emblematic of their relationships with the disease.

The cast is: Robbie Daniels, rider one; Tristan Viner-Brown: rider two; Ann Magnuson, Lorri Jean; Luis Illades, drums; Roddy Bottum, synthesizer; Robbie Lee, synthesizer; Domenica Fossati, Margaret Lancaster, Katie Cox, and Roberta Michel, flutes.

This week Roddy tweeted about the event:


my new short form opera is this Thursday in NYC… come out, the info and tix in my bio 😘

A photo posted by Roddy Bottum (@roddybottum) on

You can find more info here and buy tickets:

And here is the trailer video:

111, 2016

The Quietus interview with Chuck Mosley

November 1st, 2016|Faith No More, News|3 Comments

Jeremy Allen – one of the foremost media Faith No More experts – conducted an interview with Chuck Mosley in Paris before the find date of his Reintroduce Yourself tour and The Quietus today published the revealing Q and A.

Here are some highlights:

So tell me about your dreams.

CM: Yeah, in the dream I get invited back to play. I’m on stage with them but I can’t sing a word, I can’t remember a word and I don’t know what to do, and I freak out and hide behind an amplifier, and Billy looks disappointed at me and they’re all looking at me. I had it for a good 20 years or something – a lot! – and it was weird. And then it stopped when I started playing with them again. It stopped happening actually after the first time I went back with them.

So wait? You’re telling me they’d already auditioned Mike Patton when you were still in the band?

CM: I dunno, maybe they had. It took a while, you know, for it to come out. It could easily be that they’d already been talking to Mike before I was even done. Billy was really angry with me for a while for whatever reason. But it’s all under the bridge now, we’re all really super good.

Looking back, what would you do differently?

CM: Probably just show more that I was a team player and go along with the programme a bit more. I could never do that when I was a kid. I’ve always been a rebel and it’s got me in trouble sometimes, and probably kept me poor. And then again, maybe not, because I might not have the two daughters that I have, you know. And we’re all so close now. You know, I came full circle for a reason; I had to grow up a little bit and we all grew up and it’s all good.

 

 

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