A belated round-up

Bill Gould’s Team Rock interview

Bill Gould’s latest interview as part of the We Care a Lot re-issue promotion was a Q and A in Team Rock/Classic Rock largely focusing on the band’s early days and motivations:

Choice cuts:

With FNM, how much of what you do is art provocation and how much instinctive miscreancy?

It’s a bit of everything. People get hung up on how we fit into their box. We don’t think about it too hard. We just do what feels good.

You never seemed like one of those Last Gang In Town type of bands – more a confederacy of opposites. Fair?

Completely. We were a bunch of people with different abilities and quirks; a dysfunctional family. Jim came from the metal world, which was very different for us. [Chuck Mosley, first frontman] was the wild card; that was part of his charm. We were just playing loops and he would scream over the top. It was hard when we started getting into patterns and structure and touring – it became more like regular work. That’s when the tension started.

And

You must be proud of the band’s achievements: you defined a style of music, defied it, then defiled it.

All of that. It’s cool. You respect what you do, but at the same time you’re a bit of an iconoclast.

Every band has a voice. FNM’s is snarky, sarcastic, even satirical. Are you the hard-rock Steely Dan?

Ha ha! It’s funny, it’s almost like forensics: you have to take the dead body apart to see what the fuck it’s made of.

What a strange band.

Yeah. But at least we’re not boring.

Full interview here – offered as part of fremium service so maybe paywalled

Here are some scans – courtesy of Faith No More French Community

Mike Patton joins Dead Cross

As predicted by Patton Fanatic several months ago, Mike Patton will be the new singer in Dave Lombardo’s new project Dead Cross. Jim from FNM Followers has interviewed Justin Pearson, bassist in the supergroup:

How did this collaboration come about? Was it simply a matter of a phone call to Patton?

Well, yes. Lombardo, Crain, and myself had thought of a few people to sing, Patton being one. Fortunately for us, the universe had its shit together… and here we are.

You had written material with Gabe Serbian prior to parting ways. Did you start afresh when Patton was enlisted?

We had the songs written and recorded prior to Patton’s involvement. When we started working with Patton, he jumped in and started working on lyrics and recording vocals.

So how has Patton’s influence changed the sound?

It’s hard to explain. The band is still finding it’s own skin to fit into. No matter whom you bring into a band, the sound becomes who all are part of it. Let’s revisit this question after the album comes out, after we play shows with the new line up, and after we can reflect on things.

The album will come out in early 2017 through Patton’s Ipecac label.

Brilliant Chuck Mosley interview

One of the few pleasures of 2016 has been the rehabilitation of the reputation of Chuck Mosley during the promotion of We Care a Lot. And Chuck, who has been in the studio working on the second Primitive Race album, has given a very revealing interview with Fear and Loathing in which he expounds at length on the early days of Faith No More.

Some choice cuts:

You first met Billy Gould when you were both going to punk gigs in Hollywood ?

‘Yeah, I met him when I was about 17 or 18, I think. He was the first one of those guys I met, because I didn’t even meet Roddy until Billy had moved up to Berkeley. We both had this friend, Mark Stewart, who I had known since Elementary school. He started to play guitar around the same time that I started playing piano, but I didn’t really see him play until we were in the 12th grade or something. Then one day we were hanging out and he started playing something and I discovered that he had got really good, so I said we should start a band. He asked Billy and two other friends, Paul and Kevin, and that was what became The Animated. As soon as me and Billy met, we pretty-much clicked. He was into all the same bands that I was into, so we started going to shows together. I think he liked going out to shows with me because I didn’t have any limits, so it was like going along to see how drunk I would get or if I was going to get in a fight or what was I going to knock over or what I was going to fuck-up… It was like that most nights, I was pretty-much out of control for various personal reasons. I always went out just to see the bands, that was all I intended to do, but it would often end up in those kind of situations.’

You’d already sung with them on a couple of occasions, just as a temporary thing, hadn’t you ?

‘Yeah, because they were going through different singers and guitar players every other week. So they’d call me if they had a show in LA, and say, we haven’t got a singer, can you do it ? I’d get up and sing with them when they came down to LA without a singer. Billy always loved irony and I wasn’t a singer back then, so it made sense to him that they should ask me to sing!’

Patton Fanatic discography timeline

Patton Fanatic continue to deliver killer content and they have put together a very nifty Mike Patton discography interactive timeline on their site.

Check it out.