Mike Bordin interview with La X Mas Musica

Faith No More drummer Mike Bordin speaks about We Care a Lot and the recording process in an interview with Colombia s La X Mas Musica radio station.

Faith No More live at Live at the I-Beam

The band have now put the full show from the I-Beam , San Francisco from 13 January 1986 on their YouTube channel.

Red Hot Chili Peppers feud re-heated

After a some off-the-cuff remarks from a Fox News host, there is renewed attention on the somewhat over-played FNM v RHCP rivalry.

Here is Alternative Nation with the Fox News anchor story

And here is Jim from FNM Followers with the definitive background story on the “feud”

The Quietus We Care a Lot review

Faith No More expert Jeremy Allen has penned a detailed and psoitive review of the We Care a Lot deluxe band issue for The Quietus:

Choice cuts:

Broadly speaking, Faith No More’s time as an entity can be divided up into four distinct phases. The pre-Chuck Mosley era when they didn’t really release anything and had dalliances with various singers, including a young Courtney Love. The Chuck Mosley era from 1983 to 89. The all-conquering Mike Patton era, from 89 to 98, when they became a world straddling, MTV-sanctioned, unit-shifting rock behemoth. And the recent glorious comeback – also led by Patton – crowned with the excellent Sol Invictus album.

We Care A Lot is even less tethered to its own past because of a lack of availability. The original 10-song album hasn’t been commercially available for 20 years, and has only come to light again because de facto leader Billy Gould was having a clear out and stumbled upon the original reels (which have now been remastered by Maor Appelbaum). The record, which came out on indie label Mordam Records, is now out on the bass player’s own label, KoolArrow. Stick it on and marvel at just how fresh it sounds, in the way that Talking Heads still sounds fresh, or Infected by The The still sounds fresh.

Vinyl Factory We Care a Lot review

The Vinyl Factory also give the re-release a positive review:

Here’s one more to add to the essential re-issue campaign San Fran’s Faith No more have been releasing over the last couple of years and this could be the best yet.

AV Club Faith No More Judgement Night article

Via the resurgent Faith No More blog, there is an excellent section on the Faith No More/Boo-Ya-Tribe collaboration Another Body Murdered in this AV Club Judgement Night retrospective:

Faith No More would denounce its influence on rap-rock and nu-metal, despite bands like Korn and Limp Bizkit citing it—along with Mike Patton’s other band, Mr. Bungle—as revered inspirations. (“I do find that people who make bad music often have really good taste,” keyboardist Roddy Bottum would sneer to Noisey in 2015.) Despite their protests, between the band’s heavy, dissonant riffs and Patton’s Anthony Kiedis-enraging funk-rapping, you can definitely hear the ground being laid for the scores of bands who would strip Faith No More of all its oddball eccentricity, then regurgitate only its meatiest chunks. And in that sense, the band’s collaboration with the mostly forgotten Samoan rap crew Boo-Yaa T.R.I.B.E. on “Another Body Murdered” may as well be rap-metal’s Rosetta Stone, reducing Patton to ominous “Ohhhh” backing vocals and the lyrics to generic gun bluster, all culminating in a mookish refrain of “Bang your head to this!” You can almost imagine Fred Durst’s cousin Marvin excitedly calling him to play this over the phone.

Mike Patton features twice on greatest collaborations list

Via the excellent Patton Fantatic comes the story that Ultimate Guitar has included Mike Patton twice in their Top 25 Collaboration Albums list.
Kaada/Patton ‎- “Romances” is at 19 while The Dillinger Escape Plan with Mike Patton – Irony Is a Dead Scene is at 4.