screenshot-www.theskinny.co.uk 2015-12-21 23-31-38
Scotland’s leading music website The Skinny have always given Faith No More the coverage they deserve and this year was no exception. Fittingly then, they have just published an extensive interview with Roddy Bottum in celebration of Sol Invictus being number 11 in their albums of the year list  – and looking back on the year of the album’s release.

First of all, Roddy spoke at length publicly for the first time about his recent appearance on stage with Dinosaur Jr:

“Could you imagine?” He gasps like a man who just struck one off the bucket list. “The show was on J’s birthday – the last night of their six night residency at Bowery Ballroom. I played guitar on Start Choppin’ – pretty fun! There were a lot of guests that night – Kim Gordon and Lee Ranaldo played, Evan Dando came out onstage and sang, Kurt Vile, the dude from Negative Approach – a lot! It’s rare when a horrible guitar player like me can get onstage with J Mascis and play.”

He again recounted the album’s genesis and agreed that Bill Gould was the driving force:

“Billy wears those pants for sure. That’s the sort of person he is; he drives things forward in our band and kinda always has. When we started doing stuff again we were in different cities – I was in Los Angeles at the time, and just the prospect seemed a little crazy. It’s not that I didn’t believe in it, but I wasn’t paying a lot of attention to it. I was working on some projects, as was Mike Patton, but Billy and Mike [Bordin] really started to get into the rhythm and groove of it. Billy eventually presented it all to us and it took a while for us all to get involved, but these things happen for a reason. Honestly, that’s the way it happened back in the day. Billy was always the champion, nudging us onwards; he’s just a very motivated guy. Sol Invictus followed the course that the records of our past followed. In that way it was fitting too.”

And Roddy makes a fresh point about Mike Patton’s lyrics on this record:

“With Mike in his lyrics, and I think this is also true of the band musically… things start to evolve into a personal statement by the end of the day. I think Mike, particularly on our earlier records, would revert to taking on roles of other people and characters and not really speaking in his voice. Which is effective; that’s one process. But this record in particular took on some personal themes – that’s what’s going on, it’s about ownership, coming into our own and a resolution where we’re taking back what’s ours. It sounds selfish when I say it out loud but it’s taking artistic ownership too.”

But he makes no promises about the band’s next steps: